Tuesday, March 17, 2020

International Success and Failures of Canada Goose Inc

International Success and Failures of Canada Goose Inc International success Global demand for the company’s products is increasing every day. Product research on Canada Goose Inc has proven that market awareness in countries with similar weather conditions is increasing in due time. Most of the countries in Europe and especially in Eastern Europe have similar weather conditions like Canada.Advertising We will write a custom research paper sample on International Success and Failures of Canada Goose Inc specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More In this regard, customers in countries like Russia and the Scandinavian are now conversant with Canada Goose Inc products. Canada Goose Inc products popularity is now felt in the film industries, where the company’s cold costumes are preferred during filming in cold areas. The fact that the company’s retail business has expanded in more than 40 countries across Europe with headquarters in Sweden is encouraging (Lorinc, 2012). The recent trade engagement between Canada and international trading associations has been critical for the Canada Goose Inc international success. The recent agreement between Canada and the European Free Trade association (EFTA) is an example of how the company is succeeding in international markets. The trade agreement between Canada and the trading association has seen the company perform incredibly well in Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. Low-cost products from the company are now distributed and sold in Asia and the United States. International failures Cultural differences across potential market regions have resulted to the failure of Canada Goose Inc in foreign markets. From this perspective, the company has been unable to establish a universal brand image that reflects a common organization values. Canada Goose Inc has totally failed in enacting copyright laws that prevent piracy and counterfeiting of products (Bitti, 2011). Canada Goose Inc has suffered immensely from this internat ional problem especially in Asia and in the United States. Moreover, the company continues to suffer from lost sales derived from fake products made by foreign Asian companies. There are concerns that the company has failed in its international mandate of observing animal rights as mandated by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). For example, the company has resolved to use coyote fur in manufacturing expensive products.Advertising Looking for research paper on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More The failure of Japanese parkas products is associated with infringement of counterfeit products in the market. Consequently, the distribution network in Japan underperformed in a volatile and competitive market. In recent years, the Japanese market has been flooded by products of similar design with original Canada Goose Inc products (Kopun, 2013). Trademark infringement is not only common in Japan, but also in other European markets. The failure to maintain rising demand for Canada Goose Inc products has resulted to compromising of the products quality. This can be evidenced by the increasing cases of counterfeit products in the market. The company has also failed to maintain its market as evidenced by frequent out-of stock products. Canada Goose Inc is losing its market for lack of strategic internet usage. By not utilizing technology in an era that heavily depends on internet for information, the company continues to use conventional methods in battling counterfeits (Wells, 2011). Moreover, copyright laws differ between countries making it difficult for the company to prevent product faking. Another international failure for Canada Goose Inc is its expanded product line for other seasons. This means that the company is now risking venturing in foreign markets in America, Asia and Europe. This attracts stiff competition from other renowned brands and may risk the compa ny into financial debts. Canada Goose Inc has failed by under-investing, in business communication, in markets with stiff competition. References Bitti, M., T. (2011, July 19). Canada goose takes on counterfeiters. Financial Post, 1A. Kopun, F. (2013). Canada goose sues Sears over parka design. Web.Advertising We will write a custom research paper sample on International Success and Failures of Canada Goose Inc specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Lorinc, J. (2012). The golden goose. Web. Wells, W. (2011, November 7). Canada goose anti-counterfeiting strategy key to protecting brand. Financial Post, 1A.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Autism and Psychology

We have been designed from birth to need and trust and socialize with one another in various ways. Yet, why is it so difficult for some but not for others. I have a four year old Autistic son that also has severe developmental delays due to prematurity and birthing complications. There are days that he gets frustrated at not even being able to communicate basic needs or just wants to be in his own world, left to his own device. That for anyone is rough, but knowing I am his mother makes it worse. Social interaction is such an important part of growing as not only a human being, but also for the brain. Even from the beginning of time man has leaned on the premise of needing that companionship and contact with the world around them. Being from the South, you are instructed and taught from day one to be cordial and have social interactions regularly with others in and out of your class, race, or religion. But what if you cannot convey and relate to the social customs? Does that mean you are to forever be labeled as a deviant, eccentric, or antisocial? If it is funding that you have mental issues you don’t discuss them or you are forever looked at as a child. Traditionally, that means that these individuals were ostracized, stigmatized and even eliminated for the good of the whole, as the compromised the very fabric of society by proposing to build a group of individuals, somewhat like a cult, that were interconnected forever( Aronson, 1995). Animal test subjects have been well conditioned to run through mazes or pressed bars for food or to avoid electric shocks administered by researchers; likewise humans comply within similar consequences. Furthermore, it has also been documented that behavior motivated by external consequences is relatively short-lived, ceasing with the consequence is no longer available (Thompson, Iwata, 2001). This can even be seen when a mother is watching her children, and then steps out. The children understand to behave in both situations and the latter situation may have a punishment if that direction is not followed properly. Yet, as soon as the mother steps out, the non-conformist child will misbehave, only because of the punishment, even if the other sibling(s) is behaving themselves properly. Something stops a child like this from comprehending why this is wrong and what is truly acceptable. This may be in part to some issues with the connections to neuro-transmitters or lack thereof. Often times these children are not even motivated by reward systems, they will continue to misbehave at some point even when the mother returns, almost challenging her. Therefore, they will never be in society as an integral part, but as part of the problem. This, however, is not true for Autistic children. They wish to be the same, but again, the neuro-transmitters misfire and do not allow for them to ‘compare apples to oranges’. In 1943 Leo Kanner named such children as, socially withdrawn. He outlined the social disorder in 11 boys that he studied as an â€Å"autistic disturbance of affective contact† because of their apparent disinterest in other people and inability to be socially influenced (Kanner, 1943, in Frith, 1989). In spite of this, in 1984 the American Psychiatric Association, deemed this as a pervasive disorder, among others, and now it is simply known as Autism (APA, 1984). Over the past ten years Autism has been redefined again as the most complicated neurological disorder affecting the central nervous system of a large number of people. It is also the most confusing and pervasive of the developmental disorders as little is known for a cause, there is no cure, and treatments vary among individuals (Frith Happe’, 1994). The typical stereotype of an individual with autism describes a withdrawn, mute child with an inverted gaze engaged in repetitive activities or self-stimulatory behaviors, ASD or Autism Spectrum Disorder, ranges from severe to very mild(Mesibov Burack, 2001). Yet, the ones that have such disorders, have recently been labeled as Autistic due to lack of social prowess and extreme knowledge and fixation on one profession. These subsets of children can often times appear normal within the first year but start regressing in knowledge and skill, or not improving or gain skills at all. Eventually, one can build a wall to even keep family out, or fixate on something so hard it becomes an obsession or routine that if stopped could be mentally, physically, and socially detrimental(Kennedy Shukla, 1995). Although, it is also important to remember that individuals with ASD are not totally withdrawn, socially and may even interact from time to time, but this can be limited. I know as more going from hearing your child say ‘I love you’ and hug often, to once or twice week is difficult. The first time my son ran and hugged me and looked me in the eye was very emotional for me, but he did not understand. This leads to my next point: cognition. As I said before many ASD children do not understand emotions or are seldom empathetic. They may ask questions about the emotions you are showing but do not fully understand what you are telling them. This again is due to a misfiring of neuor-transmitters. That is why so many ASD children really like Thomas the Train. He teaches them emotions and what the facial expressions mean. My son now understand crying, anger, and excitement. Therefore, while they have a social desire, the interference in the cognitive system proves to be the main problem (Happe, 1999; Baron-Cohen, 1985; Dodge, 1980). Cognitive processing systems such as motivation, decision making and emotions are believed to be prompted when one responds to stimuli. These stimuli characterize the different mental states (desires, imagination, emotions, etc. ) that psychologists believe to be the cause of ones actions. Yet, without appropriately developed social cognition individuals have difficulty forming social relationships with others and this is evidenced by poor social behavior (Baron-Cohen, 2000). A study was designed to test this theory, and it found that 64% of individuals with ASD have first degree relatives with more extensive mental health issues, like major depression, and 39% had other social phobias (Smalley, et al, 1995). That being said, one can conclude that unlike other studies, ASD maybe a genetic disease mutated from other mental illness issues. This would also help the justice system that was once scandalized by improprieties of inmates due to a lack of knowledge. By understanding what type of ASD and the severity one can simply argue mental illness? Now I am not condoning every run out on the crazy defense, but if the shoe fits, why would we just put someone who is innocent into the system as done years ago. Think of the good old days when one could be simply thrown in jail for no id or not talking but if you have a mentally ill or developmentally disabled individual, and you put them in an environment that is rough, harsh, and not anything like their routine, it is no wonder why we had so many inmate suicides and still do inmates slip through the cracks continuously. But we may never see that happen due to public opinion. We as a society look at children with developmental delays or ASD as animals. I find it sickening. Or we think the parent does not discipline the child. Yet, due to lack of cognitive understanding, it would gain to reason why one does not benefit from punishing this type of child; they simply do not understand and are eager to please. Some may disagree but my son’s doctor actually explained to us that anything more than timeout/cool down period would be over his head. Even taking away toys would be ineffective. So the next time you are at a store take that into consideration. Now that I am off of my soapbox consider this: The acceptance of inadequacies in the empathizing process of individuals with Autism can offer more tolerance of the behaviors they display. Thus, they are not capable enough to calculate the conduct of others readily and we would expect an avoidance of impulsive situations. This is apparent in the outbursts and obsessive behaviors these individuals show in an effort to control and maintain routines in their environments (Dodge, 1980). Now some can point to sensory issues, needing to feel secure through various methods close to the five senses. A lot of the Autism community says that therapies for these aversions and how to cope will cause the ASD patient to understand, control, and manipulate to achieve a normal life. Nevertheless, the sensory struggles coincide with socio-emotional issues and are noted as early as infancy. Hence, the various longitudinal studies of infants later diagnosed with autism show empty eye gaze, poor response to name, aloofness, reduced looking-at-faces, and deficits in directing attention (Mottron Burack, 2001). And while it appears that these skills, as well as impairments in early social-communication skills and joint attention are present long before speech and mind blindness develop (Koegel Mentis, 1985; Shanker, 2004; Wing Gould, 1979). Additionally, developmental theories on attachment and affective responsiveness have suggested that children with impaired social emotional relating in infancy will not develop appropriate social understanding and as a result social interaction and communication skills will suffer (Kennedy Shukla, 1995). In spite of that, Supporters of the theory of mind suggest that people with Autism lack the ability to comprehend thoughts and experiences that occur outside of themselves (Happe, 1991). While I can see that, since my son gets stuck on one thing that happened and will talk about it for months as though it happened yesterday, the difficulty in understanding the mental thoughts of others often results in bizarre communication patterns (Happe, 1999). Thus, blindness and a clear lack of meeting of the minds, also appears to interfere with the ability to identify with others or to understand another person’s point of view (Shanker, 2004). So do we really know what people with Autism need, or are we just grabbing air in a world full of marshmallows? Bibliography American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV (1984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. ). American Psychiatric Association. Aronson, E. (1995). The social animal. (7th ed. ). New York, NY: W. H. Freeman and Company. Baron-Cohen, S. (1985). Mindblindness: An essay on autism and theory of mind. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. Baron-Cohen, S. (2000). Theory of mind and autism: A fifteen year review. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg ; D. J. Cohen (Eds), Understanding other minds: perspectives from developmental cognitive neuroscience (pp. 3-20). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Dodge, K. (1980) Social cognition and children’s aggressive behavior. Child Development. 51, 162-170. Frith, U. (1989). Autism: Explaining the enigma. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Frith, U. , Happe, F. (1994). Autism: Beyond †theory of mind. † Cognition, 50, 115-132. Happe, F. (1991). The autobiographical writings of three asperger syndrome adults; problems of interpretation and implications for theory. In U. Frith (Ed. ), Autism and asperger syndrome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Happe, F. (1999). Autism: cognitive deficit or cognitive style. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3, 6, 216-222. Kennedy, C. H. , Shukla, S, (1995). Social interaction research for people with autism as a set of past, current, and emerging propositions. Behavioral Disorders, 21, 21-35. Koegel, R. L. , Mentis, M. (1985). Motivation in childhood autism: Can they or won’t they? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 26, 185-191. Mesibov, G. B. , Adams, L. W. , ; Klinger, L. G. (1997). Autism: Understanding the disorder. New York, NY: Plenum Press. Shanker, S. (2004). The roots of mindblindness. Theory ; Psychology, 14, 5, 685-703. Smalley SL, McCracken J, Tanguay P. (1995). Autism, affective disorders, and social phobia. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 27, 60, 1, 19-26. Thompson, R. H. , ; Iwata, B. A. (2001). A descriptive analysis of social consequences following problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 169-178. Wing, L. , ; Gould, J. (1979). Severe impairments of social interaction and associated abnormalities in children: Epidemiology and classification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 9, 11-29. Autism and Psychology We have been designed from birth to need and trust and socialize with one another in various ways. Yet, why is it so difficult for some but not for others. I have a four year old Autistic son that also has severe developmental delays due to prematurity and birthing complications. There are days that he gets frustrated at not even being able to communicate basic needs or just wants to be in his own world, left to his own device. That for anyone is rough, but knowing I am his mother makes it worse. Social interaction is such an important part of growing as not only a human being, but also for the brain. Even from the beginning of time man has leaned on the premise of needing that companionship and contact with the world around them. Being from the South, you are instructed and taught from day one to be cordial and have social interactions regularly with others in and out of your class, race, or religion. But what if you cannot convey and relate to the social customs? Does that mean you are to forever be labeled as a deviant, eccentric, or antisocial? If it is funding that you have mental issues you don’t discuss them or you are forever looked at as a child. Traditionally, that means that these individuals were ostracized, stigmatized and even eliminated for the good of the whole, as the compromised the very fabric of society by proposing to build a group of individuals, somewhat like a cult, that were interconnected forever( Aronson, 1995). Animal test subjects have been well conditioned to run through mazes or pressed bars for food or to avoid electric shocks administered by researchers; likewise humans comply within similar consequences. Furthermore, it has also been documented that behavior motivated by external consequences is relatively short-lived, ceasing with the consequence is no longer available (Thompson, Iwata, 2001). This can even be seen when a mother is watching her children, and then steps out. The children understand to behave in both situations and the latter situation may have a punishment if that direction is not followed properly. Yet, as soon as the mother steps out, the non-conformist child will misbehave, only because of the punishment, even if the other sibling(s) is behaving themselves properly. Something stops a child like this from comprehending why this is wrong and what is truly acceptable. This may be in part to some issues with the connections to neuro-transmitters or lack thereof. Often times these children are not even motivated by reward systems, they will continue to misbehave at some point even when the mother returns, almost challenging her. Therefore, they will never be in society as an integral part, but as part of the problem. This, however, is not true for Autistic children. They wish to be the same, but again, the neuro-transmitters misfire and do not allow for them to ‘compare apples to oranges’. In 1943 Leo Kanner named such children as, socially withdrawn. He outlined the social disorder in 11 boys that he studied as an â€Å"autistic disturbance of affective contact† because of their apparent disinterest in other people and inability to be socially influenced (Kanner, 1943, in Frith, 1989). In spite of this, in 1984 the American Psychiatric Association, deemed this as a pervasive disorder, among others, and now it is simply known as Autism (APA, 1984). Over the past ten years Autism has been redefined again as the most complicated neurological disorder affecting the central nervous system of a large number of people. It is also the most confusing and pervasive of the developmental disorders as little is known for a cause, there is no cure, and treatments vary among individuals (Frith Happe’, 1994). The typical stereotype of an individual with autism describes a withdrawn, mute child with an inverted gaze engaged in repetitive activities or self-stimulatory behaviors, ASD or Autism Spectrum Disorder, ranges from severe to very mild(Mesibov Burack, 2001). Yet, the ones that have such disorders, have recently been labeled as Autistic due to lack of social prowess and extreme knowledge and fixation on one profession. These subsets of children can often times appear normal within the first year but start regressing in knowledge and skill, or not improving or gain skills at all. Eventually, one can build a wall to even keep family out, or fixate on something so hard it becomes an obsession or routine that if stopped could be mentally, physically, and socially detrimental(Kennedy Shukla, 1995). Although, it is also important to remember that individuals with ASD are not totally withdrawn, socially and may even interact from time to time, but this can be limited. I know as more going from hearing your child say ‘I love you’ and hug often, to once or twice week is difficult. The first time my son ran and hugged me and looked me in the eye was very emotional for me, but he did not understand. This leads to my next point: cognition. As I said before many ASD children do not understand emotions or are seldom empathetic. They may ask questions about the emotions you are showing but do not fully understand what you are telling them. This again is due to a misfiring of neuor-transmitters. That is why so many ASD children really like Thomas the Train. He teaches them emotions and what the facial expressions mean. My son now understand crying, anger, and excitement. Therefore, while they have a social desire, the interference in the cognitive system proves to be the main problem (Happe, 1999; Baron-Cohen, 1985; Dodge, 1980). Cognitive processing systems such as motivation, decision making and emotions are believed to be prompted when one responds to stimuli. These stimuli characterize the different mental states (desires, imagination, emotions, etc. ) that psychologists believe to be the cause of ones actions. Yet, without appropriately developed social cognition individuals have difficulty forming social relationships with others and this is evidenced by poor social behavior (Baron-Cohen, 2000). A study was designed to test this theory, and it found that 64% of individuals with ASD have first degree relatives with more extensive mental health issues, like major depression, and 39% had other social phobias (Smalley, et al, 1995). That being said, one can conclude that unlike other studies, ASD maybe a genetic disease mutated from other mental illness issues. This would also help the justice system that was once scandalized by improprieties of inmates due to a lack of knowledge. By understanding what type of ASD and the severity one can simply argue mental illness? Now I am not condoning every run out on the crazy defense, but if the shoe fits, why would we just put someone who is innocent into the system as done years ago. Think of the good old days when one could be simply thrown in jail for no id or not talking but if you have a mentally ill or developmentally disabled individual, and you put them in an environment that is rough, harsh, and not anything like their routine, it is no wonder why we had so many inmate suicides and still do inmates slip through the cracks continuously. But we may never see that happen due to public opinion. We as a society look at children with developmental delays or ASD as animals. I find it sickening. Or we think the parent does not discipline the child. Yet, due to lack of cognitive understanding, it would gain to reason why one does not benefit from punishing this type of child; they simply do not understand and are eager to please. Some may disagree but my son’s doctor actually explained to us that anything more than timeout/cool down period would be over his head. Even taking away toys would be ineffective. So the next time you are at a store take that into consideration. Now that I am off of my soapbox consider this: The acceptance of inadequacies in the empathizing process of individuals with Autism can offer more tolerance of the behaviors they display. Thus, they are not capable enough to calculate the conduct of others readily and we would expect an avoidance of impulsive situations. This is apparent in the outbursts and obsessive behaviors these individuals show in an effort to control and maintain routines in their environments (Dodge, 1980). Now some can point to sensory issues, needing to feel secure through various methods close to the five senses. A lot of the Autism community says that therapies for these aversions and how to cope will cause the ASD patient to understand, control, and manipulate to achieve a normal life. Nevertheless, the sensory struggles coincide with socio-emotional issues and are noted as early as infancy. Hence, the various longitudinal studies of infants later diagnosed with autism show empty eye gaze, poor response to name, aloofness, reduced looking-at-faces, and deficits in directing attention (Mottron Burack, 2001). And while it appears that these skills, as well as impairments in early social-communication skills and joint attention are present long before speech and mind blindness develop (Koegel Mentis, 1985; Shanker, 2004; Wing Gould, 1979). Additionally, developmental theories on attachment and affective responsiveness have suggested that children with impaired social emotional relating in infancy will not develop appropriate social understanding and as a result social interaction and communication skills will suffer (Kennedy Shukla, 1995). In spite of that, Supporters of the theory of mind suggest that people with Autism lack the ability to comprehend thoughts and experiences that occur outside of themselves (Happe, 1991). While I can see that, since my son gets stuck on one thing that happened and will talk about it for months as though it happened yesterday, the difficulty in understanding the mental thoughts of others often results in bizarre communication patterns (Happe, 1999). Thus, blindness and a clear lack of meeting of the minds, also appears to interfere with the ability to identify with others or to understand another person’s point of view (Shanker, 2004). So do we really know what people with Autism need, or are we just grabbing air in a world full of marshmallows? Bibliography American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV (1984). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. ). American Psychiatric Association. Aronson, E. (1995). The social animal. (7th ed. ). New York, NY: W. H. Freeman and Company. Baron-Cohen, S. (1985). Mindblindness: An essay on autism and theory of mind. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. Baron-Cohen, S. (2000). Theory of mind and autism: A fifteen year review. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg ; D. J. Cohen (Eds), Understanding other minds: perspectives from developmental cognitive neuroscience (pp. 3-20). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Dodge, K. (1980) Social cognition and children’s aggressive behavior. Child Development. 51, 162-170. Frith, U. (1989). Autism: Explaining the enigma. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Frith, U. , Happe, F. (1994). Autism: Beyond †theory of mind. † Cognition, 50, 115-132. Happe, F. (1991). The autobiographical writings of three asperger syndrome adults; problems of interpretation and implications for theory. In U. Frith (Ed. ), Autism and asperger syndrome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Happe, F. (1999). Autism: cognitive deficit or cognitive style. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 3, 6, 216-222. Kennedy, C. H. , Shukla, S, (1995). Social interaction research for people with autism as a set of past, current, and emerging propositions. Behavioral Disorders, 21, 21-35. Koegel, R. L. , Mentis, M. (1985). Motivation in childhood autism: Can they or won’t they? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 26, 185-191. Mesibov, G. B. , Adams, L. W. , ; Klinger, L. G. (1997). Autism: Understanding the disorder. New York, NY: Plenum Press. Shanker, S. (2004). The roots of mindblindness. Theory ; Psychology, 14, 5, 685-703. Smalley SL, McCracken J, Tanguay P. (1995). Autism, affective disorders, and social phobia. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 27, 60, 1, 19-26. Thompson, R. H. , ; Iwata, B. A. (2001). A descriptive analysis of social consequences following problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 169-178. Wing, L. , ; Gould, J. (1979). Severe impairments of social interaction and associated abnormalities in children: Epidemiology and classification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 9, 11-29.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

International marketing Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words - 5

International marketing - Essay Example The process of international marketing engages targeting of the consumers for a particular product in the international market, approaches to enter in the particular country, marketing mix strategies along with strategic business plans to compete in the international market (Onkvisit & Shaw, â€Å"International Marketing: Analysis and Strategy†). From the perspective of American Marketing Association (AMA), international marketing is the global practice of planning and manipulating the inherent strategies of an organization along with the pricing strategies, strategies of promotion and allocation of products, services or ideas that satisfy the consumers along with the organization goals (Onkvisit & Shaw, â€Å"International Marketing: Analysis and Strategy†). The paper intends to study about the various aspects of international marketing which will affect TATA Motors’ cars in the United States market. The study of market analysis with various aspects, such as general information of the US market, social and cultural analysis of the US consumers, economic analysis of the US market as well as political and legal situation of the US has been focused upon through this paper. Market entry strategy of TATA Motors including situational analysis, target market and product positioning along with different features of marketing mix have also been highlighted through this paper. In the present globalised market scenario within the automobile sector, the US car market is one of the most sought after places for the international car manufacturing companies. However, the car market segment of the country has faced deficits in terms of selling units. The sales of personal cars or light weight vehicles were previously 11% in the year 2010 and increased by 10% in the year of 2011. The fluctuating scenario of the US car market signifies the increasing

Saturday, February 1, 2020

School bullying Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

School bullying - Essay Example It is widely acknowledged by students, parents and educators that bullying in schools is a primary concern since it can undermine the academic climate (Whitted and Dupper 2005, p. 167). A nationwide survey conducted in the US indicates that at least 29.9% of US students in grades 6-10 are involved in some degree of bullying School intervention systems typically involve heightening the awareness of teachers, parents and children, publishing anti-bullying policies and ensuring that bully is presented as a serious matter and as such incorporated into the school’s curriculum (Woods and Wolke 2003, p. 382). All indications are therefore that bullying in schools is a serious issue and the professional counselor has a role to play in responding to the issue of bullying. The professional counselor’s role is best suited to addressing the underlying causes of bullying. Smith and Schneider (2004) present a useful profile of both victims and aggressors involved in bullying. These p rofiles are useful guidance for the professional counselor in addressing the underlying factors that contribute to bullying. According to Smith and Schneider (2004) the aggressor is typically involved in substance abuse, has a poor academic performance, has a need to be dominant and is not empathetic to victims. Bullying can also be a means of achieving or elevating the aggressor’s â€Å"social status and access to valued resources† (Smith and Schneider 2004, p. 547). ... op an understanding of themselves, the rights and needs of others† and how to deal with conflicts (Standards for School Counseling Programs in Virginia Public Schools, n.d.). The Standards for Personal/Social Development counseling are set out to prevent bulling and other forms of anti-social behavior. These standards call for a proactive and preventative approach to counseling that are by design intended to address the underlying issues and are consistent with the profiles designed by Smith and Schneider (2004). For instance the Standards for Personal/Social Development counseling provide a step by step approach which leads the counselor through the child’s social development beginning with K-3 and ending with Grades 9-12. At the K-3 level, the counselor should ensure that the student develops respect for himself and others and gains an understanding of unity and community with fellow students. The emphasis is on cooperation and empathy (Standards for School Counseling Programs in Virginia Public Schools, n.d.). These standards are obviously designed to address the underlying issues that contribute to the aggressor’s behavior. EP7 if the K-3 Counseling Standards for Personal/Social development targets the victim by guiding counselors to help the student learn to identify and seek resources in the school and the wider community (Standards for School Counseling Programs in Virginia Public Schools, n.d.). As the student moves up in school the counseling program standards for Personal/Social development require a proactive and preventative approach relative to peer influences and continued emphasis on self-respect and respect for others. The students are also counseled on the dangers of substance abuse. Both aggressors and victims should be counseled on making

Friday, January 24, 2020

Congo: The Novel and the Movie :: Art

Congo: The Novel and the Movie Congo was an astounding bestseller novel. It was a great fictional novel that took place in the depths of the Congo rainforest. The novel was later made into a movie. Both the novel and the movie were good, however, I prefer the novel. It just seemed like a more entertaining piece than the movie. This movie was based much upon the novel, but had many alternatives and a completely different ending than the novel. The first difference between the novel and the movie was the press conference that was held on behalf of Amy the gorilla. In the novel, this press conference never took place. In the novel, the press conference was held to settle a legal debate on whether or not Peter Elliot was abusing Amy and whether or not Amy should be released from Peter’s studies and experiments. However, in the movie, there was no reason stated as to why the press conference was being held. Another difference was the way that Peter and Dr. Ross met. In the novel, Dr. Ross called Peter and invited him to go on an expedition to the Congo with herself and her team. After receiving this call, Peter was begging Dr. Ross to include him on her travels. However, in the movie, Dr. Ross met up with Peter at the airport and Peter was already packed and ready to leave for his own expedition. He had no intention of taking Ross along, but he found himself with insufficient funds to pay for the trip. This pushed Peter to invite Ross along if she was to pay for the remainder of the trip’s expenses. The airplane in the novel belongs to Dr. Ross’ company Earth Resources Technology. In the movie, however, she works for TraviComm. A man named Travis is still in charge of the company in both the novel and the movie. Travis forces Dr. Ross on this mission in the movie, but in the novel, Travis finds it his last hope to send Dr. Ross. He has no initial intention to send her because he feels that she is incapable of the expedition. Dr. Ross and her team encounter a setback when they cannot fly their second plane. The cause for this in the movie is that while at the airport, the African President’s car is blown up. On the other hand, in the novel, the second plane is bugged and Amy is kidnapped.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Australian Aboriginal Art Essay

The aboriginal people mainly used ochre for artworks, such as on rock, wood, bark and the human body.Ochre is mined from particular sites. It is a special type of rock that’s heavily coloured because of the iron oxide contained inside, and comes in a variety of colours: yellow, white, red, purple (it is identical to red ochre chemically but of a different hue) and brown. It could be used on rock (cave walls, or just big rocks), wood (shields, log coffins, etc.), bark and skin, and artifacts. To get the paint from ochre rocks, one simply needs to find a rich coloured rock, ground it up, and add oil.Other materials such as charcoal and plant colourings were used to make black and dark green. Twigs, fibres and fingers were also used to get different strokes of paint, similar to the use of paintbrushes. Art is central to the Aboriginal life. It can be made for political, social, utilitarian and didactive purposes, and is inherently connected to the religious domain. Art is also a means by which the present is connected with the past and the humans with the supernatural. Art also activates the powers of the ancestral beings, expresses individual and group identity and the relationships between the land and the people. It was not until the eighteenth century, when the Europeans came to Australia, that Aboriginal art stopped being made only to fulfill traditional cultural needs, and this has only remained the in the case in varying degrees since. Contemporary Aboriginal Painting Methods In the 1930s, artists Rex Battarbee and John Gardner first introduced watercolour painting to an Indigenous man, who later used to create landscape paintings and were immediately successful and became the first indigenous Australian watercolourist. The word â€Å"contemporary† means modern or of the present time. Contemporary aboriginal paintings have adapted the usage of canvas and acrylic paints. Even though these arts still uses the traditional styles and symbols, the methods are a bit different. It is a mixture of the traditional and the modern culture. The main reasons that the European painting materials began to be popular so quickly is because using acrylic colours and canvas saves a lot of time for them and at easy to sell. You can’t really be expected to bring a big boulder to sell! Of course, even so, some artists still paint using the traditional methods. Different artists from different regions create different artworks because of their different surroundings and understandings. But even though their artworks are different, their subjects are all the same: Dream time. Aboriginal paintings and drawings are created to show how they live and how they think the world is made. Even though the materials changed, it doesn’t change the subject. Some paintings also show the aboriginals’ beliefs, but they are sacred to the tribe. These sacred paintings and drawings are only allowed to be viewed by the tribe and nobody else. 2 Contemporary aboriginal artists: Albert Namatjira was an Australian artist. He was an Indigenous Australian of the Western MacDonnell Ranges area. He is perhaps one of Australia’s best known Aboriginal painter. He was famous for his watercolour Australian outback desert landscapes, which were not in the symbolic style of the traditional paintings, but very detailed and colourful. Another is Barbara Weir. She is an Australian Aboriginal artist and politician. Her paintings include representations of particular plants and dreamings, inspired by deep Aboriginal traditions. She uses two distinctive stylistic conventions, which are linear and dot painting. Bibliography * http://www.mineralszone.com/minerals/ochre.html * http://www.aboriginalartonline.com/methods/methods.php * http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKqA3RteH1A * Aboriginal art by Caruana, Wally * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Namatjira

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Alfred Hitchcocks Movie, Psycho and its Impact on the...

Alfred Hitchcocks Movie, Psycho and its Impact on the Film Industry The 1960s marked a big change in American cinema. With the collapse of the Hollywood Studio System came a weakening of censorship laws; sex and violence moved from obscurity to the forefront of mainstream cinema (Nowell-Smith 464). Although it quickly became clear that a market existed for such films, the earliest attempts to foray into the world of modern cinema were met with ambivalence. Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho, made in 1960, was one of the first of many to depict sexuality and violence in a graphic manner (Nowell-Smith 491). Although the youth market was ready for such a change, the older audience resisted the modern trends. For this reason, Psycho was†¦show more content†¦As he put it: Our big problem...is trying to make the censors understand that the young people are much more sophisticated than they used to be (Kapsis 58). Hitchcock explained the reason for filming a woman wearing only her under garments in the opening sequence of Psycho: Audiences are changing....The straightforward kissing scene would be looked down at by the younger viewers....Nowadays you have to show them as they themselves behave (Hitchcock 1). The director was keenly aware of how audiences responded to his films (Rebello 163) and sought to maintain their interest. He was among a handful of Hollywood filmmakers who deliberately sought out innovative composers (Nowell-Smith 258); for Psycho, Hitchcock hired Bernard Hermann who wrote a modern score which challenged the norm. The title itself, fifties and sixties slang for the violently psychotic, suggested the imminence of a new generation (Brill 200). Fully aware that his film was unconventional and daring, Hitchcock used the media to sell his film to a younger, fresher audience (Kapsis 13). It was advertised as: Alfred Hitchcocks greatest, most shocking mystery with a galaxy of stars (Greene 1). The stars themselves (Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, and Anthony Perkins) were of a younger generation than the top stars Hitchcock had previously employed for his films (Finler 131). Posters for Psycho featured a scantily clad Leigh wearingShow MoreRelatedEssay Filmmakers Use of Shock in Psycho and Jaws1528 Words   |  7 Pagesdrama, with tension, suspense or surprise being the primary emotions felt by the audience as part of the situation (Dirks). However, the term is most often used in regards to an audience’s perception in dramatic works such as film. One often experiences a sense of shock in film due to the filmmaker’s ability to manipulate technical elements such as sound and camera angles in order to elicit feelings of suspense and tension from the audience. 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